Goblin War

Goblin War

By: Jim C. Hines

Goblin War is the final chapter in the Jig the Dragonslayer trilogy.  It’s an interesting end to his story, too.  Not quite what I expected, but not terrible either.  Without giving too much of it away, the ending just didn’t feel very “goblin”-like to me.  Throughout the trilogy, we’ve gotten this view of goblins as being cowardly and mostly stupid.  Jig, of course, has always been a bit different from the rest, so that helps make the ending more palatable.  The little excerpts from a previous time with Shadowstar also help in the explanation, but could have maybe been done more with.

Reading all of that over, it makes it sound like it’s a terrible ending.  It’s not.  Just not exactly what I expected.  That’s probably a good thing.  It means that Hines did a great job in keeping the plot lines turning and away from giving the ending away.

Once again, Hines’ writing is good.  He keeps very true to the characters, and they remained uniform throughout the novel and the series.  (at least, those that were in the entire series)  Much like each of the other books in the series, he introduces some new characters that are just as well written.  My favorite of the new ones was Gratz.  He’s a goblin, like Jig, but where Jig is the weakling that always seems to get it right, Gratz is the average goblin with a penchant for regulation and order.  He added a lot of light comedy to the story, and was a solid plot device in several places.

Overall, Goblin War is a fitting end to Jig’s story.  If you’ve read the first two, you need to read this one and get some closure. 😉  If you haven’t read the first two, go pick up Goblin Quest and get started.

Goblin Quest

Goblin Quest

By: Jim C. Hines

I’ve been looking to read this book for some time now, so I was delighted when it showed up on my doorstep as a birthday gift.  Having read The Stepsister Scheme, I knew that I liked Hines’ writing style.  And, besides, it’s a book about a stumbling, bumbling, Goblin hero!

Hines has admitted to the fact that his fiction isn’t necessarily “serious” fiction.  It’s meant to be taken lightly.  Which, I think, is why I like it as much as I do.  After reading books like Gardens of the Moon that take themselves overly seriously with their immense world building and plot twisting and deep cast of characters, good fiction like that of Hines’ is a welcome break.  Please don’t get me wrong, however.  Hines still has world building, plot twisting, and a fairly good cast of characters.  But, it isn’t so over done and analyzed to need 1000 pages to elaborate on it.  Which, again, is why I like it.

With Goblin Quest, Hines drops us into the world of Jig the Goblin.  He’s a runt among runts.  We quickly learn his place in the Goblin society, and then he is dragged from it and into that of a rag tag group of adventurers who seek a tool of great magical power.  We follow Jig and his group as they delve even further into the caves and into a world made of magic.  Hobgoblins, giant bats, animated dead, necromancer fairies, and a few ogres and dragons stand in their path.  Throughout, we are privy to Jig’s realization that his is a race of cowards and as he grows.

This is a fun book!  It’s a quick and easy read, and I quickly found myself sucked into Jigs story.  It has all the elements of a great fantasy book, but without all the pretentiousness of many “epic” fantasy novels.

Bottom line, if you’re looking for a book that’s well written and that is an entertaining, good read, you should pick up Goblin Quest.  I’ll be picking up the sequels as soon as I can.